Thursday, January 28, 2016

Linux-supported File systems (Part-1)



Working with Linux-supported File systems

§  Controlling Filesystem Mounting and Unmounting


1.Mounting Filesystems

   In a Linux system contains entirely arbitrary data when installing.  A partition contains a filesystem ( a way of organsning  data into files and directories in which one filesystem is made the root filesystem (the root directory on that filesystem becomes the directory named /)  and other filesystems can be mounted (the root directory of that Filesystem is grafted onto a directory of the root filesystem).
·        The directory grafted onto is called the mount point.

2.Mounting a Filesystemusing the mount command
·        The important filesystems are mounted at boot-up; other filesystems can be mounted or unmounted at anay time
·        The mount command is used to mount a filesystem
·        You usually need to have a root user (administrator) permission to mount a filesystem.
·        For example, may systemsare configured so thatit will mount the contentof the machine’s CD-ROM drive under the directory/mnt/cdrom.

$ mount/mnt/cdrom



3.   Monting Other Filesystems
·        Mount /dev/sdb3/mt/extra mounts the filesystem stored in the /dev/sdb3 device on the mount point /mnt/extra
·        You may occasionally need to specify the filesystem type explicitly for which the syntax.
·        You may occasionally need to specify the filesystem type explicity for which the syntax is;

# mount-t vfat /dev/hdd1/mnt/windows


·        Allowable filesystem types are listed in the mount (8) manpage
·        Run mount without any optios to see a list of the filesystems currently mounted 

4.   Unmounting a Filesystem using the unmount command
·        A filesystem can be unmounted by using the umout command
·        Umount/mnt/extra unmounts whatever is on the /mnt/extra mount point
·        Umount/dev/sdb3 unmounts the filesystem in the /dev/sdb3 device, wherever it is mounted
·        You normally needto have a root permission to unmount a filesystem
·        You normally need to have root permission to unmount a filesystem
·        It’s also impossible to unmount a ‘busy’ filesystem
 A filesystem is busy if a process has a file on it open
 Or if a process has a directory within it as ;its current directory

5.   Configuring mount: /etc/fstab
·        The /etc/stab file contains information about filesystems that are know to the system administrator.
·        Specifying a filesystem in /etc/fstab makes it possible to use its mount point as the only argument to mount
·        /etc/fstab makes it jpossible to use its mount point as the only argument to mount
·        /etc/fstab also configures the filesystem that should be mounted at boot-up
·        Each line in /etc/fstab describes on filesystem and on each line six columns are present.


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