Thursday, January 28, 2016

Linux-supported File systems (Part-2)



6.   Sample /etc/fstab

  • ·        A/etc/stab file look like as follows;

Table 2: /etc/fstab

#device
Mount-point
Type
Options (dump)
Pass-no


/dev/hda3
/
Ext2
Defaults
1
1

/dev/hda1
/boot
Ext2
Defaults
1
2

/dev/hda5
/usr
Ext2
Defaults
1
2

/dev/hdb1
/usr/local
Ext2
Defaults
1
2

/dev/hdb2
/home
Ext2
Defaults
1
2

None
/proc
Proc
Defaults
0
0

/dev/scd0
/mnt/cdrom
Iso9660
Noauto.user,ro
0
0

/dev/fd0
/mnt/floppy
Auto
Noauto.users
0
0




7.   Filesystem Types

  •   The network filesystems includes nfs (Unix-specific) and smbfs (Windows or Samba) 


Table 3: Common Filesystem
Type
Usage
Ext2
Refers tothestandrd Linux filesystem
Iso9660
Refers to the filesystems used on CD ROM
Proc
Refers to the way a kernel report to system information to user processes
Vfat
Refers to the filesystems used by Windows 95


8.   Mount options:  Mount options are those options thatare used in /etc/fstab and are separated by comma .  These options are used with –o on the mount command line to perform specific functions.


Table 4: Common Mont Options
Option
Description
noauto
Prevents thefilesystem being mounted ;at bootup. Useful for removable media
ro
Mounts the filesystem as read-only
Users
Lets non-root users mount and unmount this filesystem
user
Refers to like users, but non-rooot users can only unmount filesystems that theythemselves mounted.



9.   Other colums in /etc/fstab
  •  The fifth column is called dump and is used torestore backup utilities.  You can use 1 for normal filesystems, and 0 for removable filesystem

  •  The sixth column is called pass-no

  •   Controls the order in which automatically-mounted filesystems are checked by fsck

  • Use 1 for the root filesystem

  • Use 0 for filesystems that aren’t mounted at boot-up

  • Use2 for other filesystem
10.    Mounting a File
  •  Linux can mount a filesystem stored in a normal file, instead of a disk by a disk ;by using loop devices

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